Technology Today and How it Has Changed Over the Years

How Technology has Changed the World

How Technology has Changed the World

Technology has risen over the years and makes everything possible; things we do not believe in the past, everyone is surrounded by technology in this modern era.

If we look at the timeline of how technology helps human everyone and makes everyone’s life becomes easy. Today everyone depends on smartphones and the internet to connect with each other and shop or buy anything technology is helping every individual.

Technology has helped humans survive in this world and create a difference around the world connect with people all across the globe.

Technology Today and How it Has Changed Over the Year.

1. Telephones

THEN:

A mobile phone call was made to the United Kingdom for the very first time on January 1, 1985, using the brick-like Transportable Vodafone VT1, which cost £2,000 (about £5,000 in today’s money). After fifteen years, over half of the population (46%) possessed a cell phone.

NOW:

Today, roughly 95% of UK homes possess a mobile phone — a ratio that has stayed consistent since 2015 – and there are approximately 5.3 billion global mobile phone users. The majority of these gadgets are smartphones, which Apple initially presented in 2007 with the release of the iPhone. The typical mobile phone has more capacity than the Apollo 11 computer;It was the craft that took Neil Armstrong and his fellow astronauts to the moon and back in 1969.

2. Gaming

THEN:

Shortly after the world escaped the dreaded Millennium virus – phew! – Sony released the PlayStation 2 (officially branded as PS2), which went on to become the best-selling video game system of all time, selling over 155 million copies worldwide at the time of writing. At the turn of the century, Nokia dominated the mobile phone industry, and Snake was the handset game of choice for passing the time — mostly because it was the only handset game available.

NOW:

There are now 2.5 billion players on the earth, and the global gaming sector is worth more than $152 billion (£117 billion), with mobile games accounting for 45 percent, or $68.5 billion (£52 billion). Furthermore, eSports – in which people watch celebrities play video games – has flourished in recent years, with stadiums filled for tournaments and 400 million people tuning in to witness the action.

3. Television

THEN:

The Sopranos, Friends, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and South Park were among the most popular television series in 2000, and the majority of these shows were seen on DVD box sets. With over 19 million viewers, the January 3 episode of Coronation Street was the most-watched item on terrestrial television in 2000.

NOW:

According to the most recent figures, Netflix – one of the top streaming services accessible today – has over 160 million customers worldwide. Netflix stated in January 2020 that 76 million households watched The Witcher, making it the most-watched first season of television in the company’s history. The most-watched terrestrial programming in the UK at the time of writing is the January 5 episode of Call the Midwife, with 8.81 million viewers — 10 million fewer than the most outstanding result in 2000.

4. Music

THEN:

Portable compact disc players were still popular twenty years ago – there were some MP3 players on the market, but they were pricey and fussy, so they never really took off. Apple’s game-changing iPod was also a year away from its release in 2000. Westlife’s song I Have a Dream and Shania Twain’s album Come on Over topped the British charts at the turn of the century, selling 231,000 and 239,559 copies, respectively.

NOW:

David Bowie’s remark in a 2002 interview that music will soon “become like flowing water or electricity” proved prophetic: streaming is already hugely popular. Apple Music, which costs £9.99 a month, has more than 60 million members — the same number of tunes it offers – while Spotify has more than 100 million clients. The album, perhaps, is dead as a result of this streaming and a huge selection of music. Our smartphones are now the most popular way to listen to music – though, strangely, vinyl has made a resurgence – which is logical given that an average 128GB cellphone can carry over 20,000 tracks. The UK’s official downloads chart debuted in 2015, and when the new decade began, Tones & I’s Dance Monkey was the top-ranked track. Spotify reached a mind-boggling one billion downloads in January.

5. Business Communication

THEN:

In the year 2000, high-flying executives and ladies frequently carried hefty mobile phones, Cameras, dictation machines, pagers, and personal digital assistants are further examples (PDAs). Face-to-face meetings were still common, while fax machines and letters in the mail were still widely used. However, with the advent of Hotmail in 1996, electronic mail was on the increase.

NOW:

There are a plethora of corporate communication choices in 2020, including chatbots, online live chat, Slack-like work channels, social media, text messaging, WhatsApp, video conferencing, and more.

6. Text Messaging

THEN:

A British-based communications engineer transmitted the world’s first text message in December 1992, using a home computer. A year later, Nokia produced the first mobile phone capable of sending text messages, which were painstakingly entered using a number keypad. The typical American was sending 35 SMS each month by the year 2000.

NOW:

In 2020, around 5 billion individuals will send and receive conventional text messages. Most people, however, prefer to write to one another via other smartphone-enabled channels, such as social media and WhatsApp. This Facebook-owned messaging service is on track to reach 2 billion users this year. Nonetheless, according to Moneypenny’s most recent data, a phone call remains the most common way for clients to contact businesses in the UK.

The 21 percent for WhatsApp, the 23 percent for text messaging, the 24 percent for live chat, the 28 percent for online forms, and the 50 percent for emails are all lower than the 56 percent for a good, old-fashioned, human-to-human call. That is why, after 20 years and counting, and despite various technological advances in the digital era, Moneypenny is still thriving.

About Kate Magon 48 Articles
Kate Magon is a writer, story teller and a public speaker for many years. She has more than 5 years experience in content writing and she recently became a contributor at technewzbazaar. Cooking delicious food and travelling across the various places are her hobbies. Read her contribution on technewzbazaar dot com and leave your comments.

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